Page 36 - Scene Magazine June 2022 4706
P. 36

Local Interest
BY THOMAS C. C Richard A. Henry
   OLEMAN,
Funeral Home and Cremation Services
 Funeral services today, are personalized to the families wishes, wants, and needs.
  thing it is that consumer’s purchasing knowledge is king. It seems that every- one is purchasing online and doing their research prior to making that purchase. Funeral services are no exception.
Along with this increased knowledge comes families that are better informed and desire more options than ever before. Things such as green burial and green cemetery, cremation, embalming, scattering of cremains, alkaline hydro- lysis, earth burial, entombment, niche, columbarium, human composting,
Traditionally the funeral industry
has been slow to adapt change. In this service-driven business many have not seen the need for a reliance on technol- ogy. Technology which is readily avail- able and common in other industries. Yet in the past two years, if you didn’t have the basics such as livestream capabilities, the ability to make ar- rangements whether at-need or pre-need and to sign documents remotely, you were thrust into a big learning curve. Most of us figured it out quickly, if we weren’t already doing those things. What we realized was that like so many other important purchases in our lives, families simply looked online at funeral homes offerings in their area. This is not a completely new reality. In the last decade funeral price comparisons has entered the mainstream, and the last two
years has only strengthened that idea. The progressive funeral homes that are abreast of change, now openly disclose pricing on their website.
and solidified cremains are all options available to families here in Michigan (with the exception of alkaline hydro- lysis and human composting which are not yet approved in Michigan at this time). Even with access to research and information about these options it can feel overwhelming.
Today more than ever, we live in a consumer driven society and consumers are more informed than ever before. If the last two years have taught us any-
services and pricing, this can allow a family to commence their planning. Maybe even start the funeral planning online.
Another aspect of our consum- er-driven culture today is the desire for everything instantly. We have become accustomed to that ‘click of a button’ access to information and to purchas- ing. Companies like Amazon have made it so easy to purchase just about anything online, with one click, any- time, anywhere. How has this affected the funeral industry? Families want ac- cess to information instantly, especially pricing, and those funeral homes that do not offer this may be missing out. Take the family that returns from the hospital, or gets the call about a death, in the early hours of the morning. They can turn to the Internet to start consid- ering arrangements. If a funeral home has provided full disclosure of their
Funeral services today, are personal- ized to the families wishes, wants and needs. With all of the options available to families, it makes the role of the fu- neral director even more important. The role as a resource person and educator on end-of-life issues takes on a greater importance. Being knowledgeable re- garding the options and the availability of each in our specific area is paramount and a quality one should look for in a funeral home. We are here as a resource and educator when the end-of-life issues take on a greater importance to your family.
 A proud part of
this place we call home.
703 Capital Ave., SW, Battle Creek www.henryfuneralhome.org • 269-962-5191
 36 SCENE 4706 I ANNUAL REPORT
JOSEPH U. STASA • THOMAS C. COLEMAN • PAULA S. COLEMAN • DENNY P. SEIVERT
 














































































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