Page 9 - Scene Magazine 45-10 October 2020
P. 9

 Scene Around Town
   BY PETER PHELPS
   of time they have been hitting and missing on their fore-
casts by around 50 percent. The ques- tion remains, will this winter’s weather be colder, warmer, or milder than last year’s?
Let’s look at the magazine rack in the checkout lane in one of our local grocery stores where you will discover two, under-sized booklets with yel-
low and tan covers; one titled The Old Farmer’s Almanac (OFA), and the other The Farmers’ Almanac (FA). They are different and somewhat the same. The OFA was first published in 1792 and calls Dublin, New Hampshire its home. Just across the border, the similarly titled FA, which made its debut 26 years later, is headquartered in Lewiston, Maine. Both states boast of old farmers, thus the names I guess.
other related things, as almanacs tend to do.
So, my advice from neither an old farmer nor a meteorologist, is that if you live around Battle Creek come mid-Oc- tober or November through maybe April, you should put an extra coating of car wax on your snow shovel; keep an emergency road kit with gloves, mittens, and an ice scraper in the family truckster; keep your down vest up on the coat rack; and drive a little slower so you can safely be Scene Around Town. Now if I can just remember which drawer I put my Bermuda shorts and Hawaiian shirts in, I’ll be ready for tomorrow’s weather... just in case. And remember, there is no such thing as bad winter weather, only the wrong clothes.
Anyway, truth be told, that seems to be about the only differences in the publications, other than the placement of the apostrophes in their names since they both supply agriculturalists with weather and growing conditions, and
is about the only profession where you can be consistently wrong and still keep your job. It seems that forecasting
For hundreds of years, prognosti- cators have been... well prognosti- cating about the weather. And for approximately
Cold weather is snow problem.
Both pamphlets claim to have secret formulae for predicting the weather ‘claiming’ accuracy at about 80 percent. The operative word there is ‘claiming’ because classically trained meteorolo- gists refute those numbers; they say that the almanacs deal with broad generali- ties about weather. Which brings to my mind that even with all of the satellites and technologies today, meteorology
any weather beyond a day or two in Michigan is a crap-shoot. That said, we still tune in to hear what weather might befall us tomorrow.
the same amount
We also hear a lot about signs of nature that are supposed to let us know what might be coming in terms of weather. Quite frankly I don’t know if the wooly bear is wooly or bare since I avoid insects at all costs. Farther above ground, if birds are flocking, are they just out for a ride or does all that flight- iness actually mean something? Are the number of acorns on the ground indic- ative of severe weather ahead, or are they there because I have lazy squirrels or perhaps I have yet to rake the nuts up from under my oak trees?
  Pre-Planning is a Gift to Your Family.
Always
find opportunities to make someone smile, and to offer random acts of kindness in everyday life.
– Roy T. Bennett
                    Funeral Directors: Fred Bachman & Lexie Stygar . 223 N. Bedford Rd., Battle Creek . 269-965-5145 . www.bachmanhebble.com
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