Page 8 - Scene Magazine 45-06 June 2020
P. 8

  B.C. City Scene
BY REBECCA FLEURY Battle Creek City Manager
    to our neighbors.
A great, recent example is our work
• We can adjust other city services
in important ways, to benefit Battle Creek neighbors. One way is provid- ing fare-free rides on Battle Creek Transit buses and Tele-Transit, to limit interactions between riders and drivers, helping prevent the virus’ spread. Another is to temporarily stop water shutoffs, and return water service to those shut off when the pandemic struck. We want everyone to be able to follow handwashing and hygiene guidelines, and this is a way we can help.
with Oakland County to provide a sys- tem for online and credit card payments for many city services.
• We can make public meetings even more accessible to the community, by offering multiple ways to submit public comment, and by streaming them live on our Facebook page. From the twice-monthly City Com- mission, to the Dickman Road Busi- ness Improvement District, to the Economic Development Corp, and Public Transportation Committee, more people than ever can witness, and participate in, this part of local government.
More than any other time, the coronavirus pandemic already has challenged us to collaborate more, in new ways, and has tested our creativity. We must protect the health and safety of our community, while still provid- ing the best possible city services and programs.
Unfortunately, this moment requires us to delay and cancel many of the events and programs in Battle Creek
– and everywhere. But to borrow the phrase our public information officers use in the graphics and videos summa- rizing the governor’s orders guiding our actions – what CAN we do? We must ask this question as we continue into this changing reality, where we must strictly limit in-person interactions.
• We can develop ways to help support our local businesses. Our Small Business Development (SBD) team worked with several local businesses to create EatsBC.com – a market- place to connect neighbors to local restaurants providing carryout and delivery services. We are thrilled
These are some examples of how the city can continue serving our community. We are facing budget, service, and other challenges – as
are communities across the State of Michigan, and the United States. No matter the situation, we continue to show up, work together, and provide the important and critical services our community needs.
So what can the City of Battle Creek do to serve our community during this challenging time?
to help more restaurants sign up; as Umami Ramen reopened, the online
In local govern- ment, we constant- ly collaborate with other agencies, communities, and organizations to provide better ser- vices and programs
• We can share our facilities for alter- nate uses. Since early in our pandem- ic planning, we have worked with the SHARE Center and Haven of Rest Ministries to provide day and night shelter to our homeless neighbors at our Full Blast recreation facility. At our Department of Public Works, we receive personal protective equipment deliveries, store them, and get these items out where they are needed in the community.
orders overwhelmed EatsBC, and it had to close Umami orders so they could catch up! The SBD team also has developed the Rent and Mort- gage Assistance Program, to help small businesses in Battle Creek, es- pecially in key areas. In late May, we had 48 applicants, and were working with them to present as many checks as possible.
Creative Solutions For Challenging Times
Since 1882
                                                  8 SCENE 4506 I ANNUAL REPORT
105 Capital Ave., NE / 269-962-5527 / www.farleyestesdowdle.com
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