Page 6 - Senior Times October 2019 26-10
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Page 6
Senior Times - October 2019
 OVERCOME ROADBLOCKS TO HEALTHY EATING
By: Sherii Sherban, Publisher
According the National Institute on Aging (NIA) there are many common reasons why mature adults experience challenges with health eating. If you or your loved one expe- rience any of these the following solutions might help to get them on track toward a more healthy diet.
• Cooking or eating alone.
• Food tastes different.
• Food and medicines interact.
• Weight issues adding to frailty.
• Feeling sad and don't want to eat.
• Just not hungry.
• Trouble getting enough calories.
• Problems chewing food.
• Sometimes hard to swallow food.
• Lactose intolerant.
• Physical problems making it hard to eat.
  some of the others. Whenever your doctor prescribes a new drug for you, be sure to ask about any food-drug interactions.
 Risk factors include:
Frailty can be impacted by not getting enough of the right nutrients as well as excess weight. These problems can put you at risk of developing weak bones and mus- cles, which can make you frail and unable
to do daily activities. Obesity is a growing problem in the United States, and the number of older people who are overweight or obese is also increasing.
Consider the following suggestions from NIA for dealing with these common chal- lenges.
new cooking skills. You can go online to find information on basic cooking techniques and recipes for one person. Borrow simple cook- books from your local library, or try an adult education cooking course. TV cooking shows might be helpful. They often show you step- by-step how to prepare and cook foods. Some grocery stores even have cooking coaches available to answer your questions.
But, just losing weight is not necessarily the answer. That’s because sometimes when older people lose weight, they lose even more muscle than fat. That puts them at greater risk for becoming frail and falling. They also might lose bone strength and be at risk for a broken bone. Exercise helps you keep muscle and bone. Also, for some people, a few extra pounds late in life can act as a safety net should they get a serious illness that limits how much they can eat for a while.
Are you tired of cooking or eating alone? Find new ways to eat with friends. Maybe you are tired of planning and cooking din- ners every night. Have you considered pot- luck meals? If everyone brings one part of the meal, cooking is a lot easier, and there might be leftovers to share. Or try cooking with a friend to make a meal you can enjoy together. Also look into having some meals at a nearby senior center, community center, or religious facility. Not only will you enjoy a free or low-cost meal, but you will have some company while you eat.
Are foods not as tasty as you remember? It might not be the cook’s fault! Maybe your sense of taste, smell, or both, has changed. Growing older, having dental problems, and medication side effects can cause your senses to change. Taste and smell are important for healthy appetite and eating. Try adding fresh herbs, spices, or lemon juice to your plate. If you drink alcohol or smoke, cutting back can improve your sense of taste.
The NIA Dietary Guidelines encourage people 65 and older who are overweight to try to avoid gaining more weight. Those who are very overweight (obese) might be helped by intentional weight loss, especially if they are at risk for heart disease. So, if you think you weigh too much, check with your doctor before starting a diet. He or she can decide whether or not losing a few pounds will be good for you and how you can safely lose weight.
Give cooking a try... again. It’s never too late to refresh your skills or to learn some
Have you experienced your food and medicines interacting? Medicines can change how food tastes, make your mouth dry, or take away your appetite. In turn, some foods can change how certain medicines work. You might have heard that grapefruit juice
is a common culprit when used with several drugs. Chocolate, licorice, and alcohol are
Feeling blue now and then is normal, but if you continue to feel sad, ask your doctor for help. Being unhappy can cause a loss of
   SENIOR DINING CENTERS
 CITY
Hastings Woodland
Albion Battle Creek Battle Creek Battle Creek Marshall Tekonsha
Jackson Jackson Napoleon Spring Arbor
LOCATION
COA Building Eagles Club
FACILITATOR
Theresa Lancaster Leona Rairigh
PHONE
(269) 948-4856
(269) 367-4041
DAYS TIME
M-F 10am-2pm
M,W,F 10:30am-1pm
 BARRY COUNTY
      Delton
Faith United Methodist
Angela Soya
(269) 579-3918
M,W,T
11am-1pm
 Nashville
Main St. Banqets
Jenny Burlison
(517) 213-9212
M-F
10:30am-1pm
 Meals provided by Barry County Commission on Aging. A program sponsored by Barry County United Way.
 BRANCH COUNTY
       Coldwater
 Coldwater Church of Christ
 Alisha Carr
 (517) 279-8249
 M,T,Th,F
 9am-1pm
 Lunch Served at 12pm
 Meals provided by Community Action Food and Nutritional Services. Funding sources AAA 3C, Branch County United Way, USDA, and private donations.
 CALHOUN COUNTY
       Albion
Albion Forks Senior Dining Center
Cynthia Rose
(866) 200-8877
M,T,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 12pm
 Clarence Township Dining Center Bedford Manor Dining Center Lakeview 900 Territorial Dining Center Westbrook Place Dining Center Heritage Commons
Tekonsha Community Hall
Mark Rice Billy Castle Karl Hoard Michelle Dove Kitty Knoll
Senior Health Partners
(866) 200-8877 (866) 200-8877 (866) 200-8877 (866) 200-8877 (269) 558-6150
(269) 441-0948
M,T,W M,T,W,Th,F M,W,F M,T,W,Th,F T, Th
T
10:30am-1pm 10:30am-1pm 10:30am-1pm 10:30am-1pm 12-1pm
10am
Lunch served at 11:45am Lunch served at 11:30am Lunch served at 11:30am Lunch served at 11:30am Lunch served at 12pm
Senior Fit & Fun, Lunch after
Athens
Athens Lighthouse Community Center
Senior Health Partners
(269) 441-0948
Th
10am
Senior Fit & Fun, Lunch after
Battle Creek
Cherryhill Manor Senior Center
Constance Siegel
(866) 200-8877
M,T,W,Th,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Battle Creek
Springview Towers Dining Center
Eileen Worthington
(866) 200-8877
M,T,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 11:30am
Homer
Homer Presbyterian Church
Senior Health Partners
(269) 441-0948
T
10:30am
Senior Fit & Fun, Lunch after
Marshall
Marshall House Dining Center
Deb Trescott
(866) 200-8877
M,W,F
10:30am-1pm
Lunch served at 12pm
 All sites have hot and cold meals. Meals provided by Senior Services SW MI. Funding by Calhoun County Senior Services, CareWell Services - AAA 3B, USDA, and private donations.
 JACKSON COUNTY
 Grass Lake
 Grass Lake Food With Friends
 Annie Lavergne
 (517) 788-4364
 T, Th
 10am-3:30pm
 Lunch served at 12pm
 Crouch Senior Center
King Rec Center, Food with Friends Napoleon Township Hall
Spring Arbor Senior Center
Laurie Mead Laurie Mead Gail Jamieson
Shimone Glaspie
(517) 788-4364 (517) 788-4364 (517) 788-4364
(517) 750-1010
M,T,W,Th,F M,T,W,Th,F T, Th M,T,W,Th,F
8am-4pm 10:30am-1:30pm 10:30am-1:30pm
9:45am-1:45pm
Lunch served at 12pm Lunch served at 12pm Lunch served at 12pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Jackson
Park Forest
Laurie Mead
(517) 788-4364
M,T,W,Th,F
10:30am-1:30pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Michigan Center
St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church
Laurie Mead
(517) 788-4364
M,W,F
10am-2pm
Lunch served at 12pm
Norvell
Norvell/Township Hall
Gail Jamieson
(517) 788-4364
M,W,F
10:30am-1:30pm
Lunch served at 12pm
 To have your senior dining center added or changes to your listing, Call Sherii at (269) 979-1412 ext. 302 or Email: ssherban@wwthayne.com
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